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Blandford Throwback Facts X

 


In 1817, sculptor Alfred Stephens was born in Blandford. He created the Duke of Wellington’s monument in St Paul’s Cathedral.

In 1818, the Portsmouth mail coach overturned in a collision with a cart near the churchyard. While at the November fair, pickpockets were active and also Mr Kerley lost his crossbred dog.

In 1820, two Blandford brothers  were executed in  Dorchester for highway                      robbery.

Horse drawn coaches left the Crown Hotel every day for Poole, Weymouth, London, Portsmouth, Brighton, Bath, Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth and Falmouth.

In 1821, forty members of a single family were found to be living in the same Blandford house.

            Robert Wilson, innkeeper at the White Hart Inn was fined ten shillings (50p) and was deprived of his licence for three years for allowing ‘tippling’ in his public house during Divine Service.

A Ball was held in the Greyhound Inn to celebrate the coronation of King George IV.

In 1822, the Sheep Fair was moved from Sheep Market Hill to a field adjoining Salisbury Street.

In 1823, town Clerk Septimus Smith was ordered to prosecute anyone who let off fireworks on 5th November.

In 1824, Luzborough, owned by later to be Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, won the Dorsetshire Gold Cup at the Blandford Races.

          Isadore Brine, an African servant, was buried in the new Damory Lane burial ground.

In 1826, the Minister of Stourpaine refused to bury a child who had died of smallpox because the child had been baptised by a Methodist preacher. However, after being threatened with legal action the Minister withdrew his objection.

(Illustration: Blandford Market Place)

 




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